Articles

Eugene Marais

DMAJOR


Dorris Lessing wrote of Eugene Marais: “He offers a vision of nature as a whole, whose parts obey different time-laws, move in affinities and linkages we could learn to see: parts making wholes on their own level, but seen by our divisive brains as a multitude of individualities, a flock of birds, a species of plant or beast. We are just at the start of an understanding of the heavens as a web of interlocking clocks, all differently set: an understanding that is not intellectual, but woven into experience. Marais brings this thought down into the plain, the hedgerow, the garden.”
Here is a collection of material from various sources related to the South African scientist and poet, Eugen Marais.

A Vindication of Weston Price’s ideas

SMITHSONIAN.COM / LINK


This Simthsonian article explains the link between dental structure and the change to an agricultural diet. Weston Price was right. The emergence of agricultural practices initiated major changes to the jaw structure of ancient humans, leading to dental problems we still experience.

Link: Four Thousand Years Ago, Indians landed in Australia

LULU MORRIS, LINK TO NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC


Genetic evidence suggests that just over 4 millennia ago a group of Indian travellers landed in Australia and stayed. The evidence emerged a few years ago after a group of Aboriginal men’s Y chromosomes matched with Y chromosomes typically found in Indian men.  Up until now, the exact details, though, have been unclear…

The Empires of the Sun and the West

EVA BRANN / LINK


A comprehensive discussion on the contact between the Aztec, Inca, and Spanish cultures.

I shall begin with two sets of facts and dates. On or about August 8 of 1519 Hernán Cortés, a hidalgo, a knight, from Medellin in the Estremadura region of Spain, having sailed his expeditionary fleet from Cuba to win “vast and wealthy lands,” set out from a city he called Villa Rica de la Vera Cruz on the Gulf of Mexico to march inland, west toward the capital of Anahuac, the empire of the Nahuatl-speaking Aztecs. The city was called Tenochtitlan and its lord, the emperor, was Montezuma Cortés knew of the place from the emperor’s coastal vassals and from delegations Montezuma had sent loaded with presents to welcome—and to forestall—the invaders. The presents included many works of well-crafted gold…

Link: Some facts and figures about Universal Suffrage in the UK

WILLIAM COLLINS / LINK


The popular belief is that the suffragettes won the vote for women and before that men already had the vote. Both these beliefs are false. The property-based right to vote goes back at least to King Henry VI in 1432, when it was established that only people owning property worth 40 shillings or more could vote. Since this sum remained unchanged over centuries, the natural effect of inflation was to increase the size of the electorate. But even by the eighteenth century, the electorate was still only about 1% or 2% of the population

Link: The Origin of a “Revolutionary Theory”

Helian.net


Link

Eugene Marais was a human community in the person of one man. He was a poet, an advocate, a journalist, a story-teller, a drug addict, a psychologist, a natural scientist. He embraced the pains of many, the visions of the few, and perhaps the burden was too much for one man… As a scientist he was unique, supreme in his time, yet a worker in a science then unborn. – R. Ardrey, The Soul of the Ape (Introduction)

Gaston Naessens: Somatid and Somatoscope

Fitzraven Sky


Gaston Naessens’ somatid theory of the origins of cancer, the result of over 40 years of research in bacteriology and biology (the last 20 funded personally by the late David Stewart of the MacDonald-Stewart Foundation), has its roots in the concept of pleomorphism, first advanced by Antoine Bechamp in France in the 1870’s. Pleomorphism is the assumption of multiple forms, or stages, by a single organism during its life cycle. Bechamp postulated such a pleomorphic (literally, shape-changing) micro-organism, which he named “microzymia” as a common progenitor of all bacteria.

Royal Rife and Hepatitis

Ken Welch


On August 19th the New England Journal of Medicine carried an article warning that 2.7 million Americans now carry the Hepatitis-C virus, according to statistics from the CDC. This would make Hepatitis, a potentially fatal disease, the most common blood-borne infection in the country. Globally, the World Health Organization has reported that almost half the world’s population carries one or more of the various hepatitis virus, and fatalities are greater than for HIV.

Philippa Uwins and Nanobes

Philippa Uwins and her colleagues at the University of Queensland, Australia, noticed strange structures growing on sandstone rock samples they had broken open for studying. The rock samples had been retrieved from 3 to 5 Kilometres below the ocean bed where atmospheric pressure is around 2000x normal, and temperatures range between 115 to 170 degs Centigrade; not an easy place for living things to flourish!
This initial discovery was curious enough but when the team found that containers and equipment in their laboratory were being ‘colonised’ by these structures, they realised whatever they had found was growing! Samples were collected from polystyrene petri dishes with sterilised micro-forceps and examined in a powerful SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) operating at 80 Kvolts.

Radio Interview (transcript) with Philippa Uwins about Nanobes

Nanobes are a group of organisms which were discovered growing in some sandstone samples that came from outer western Australia. The interesting thing about the nanobes is that they’re in a size range that’s argued, on a current understanding of biological theory to be too small to exist. And the other interesting aspect of the nanobes is that they’re in the same size range as the controversial Martian nanobe bacteria that were found in a meteorite some years ago.