Articles

A History of the Germ Theory

R. Pearson


Extract from Bechamp or Pasteur?

If you go back into the history of the medical profession and the various ideas regarding the cause of disease that were held by leading physicians before Pasteur first promulgated his notorious “germ theory”, you will find convincing evidence that Pasteur discovered nothing, and that he deliberately appropriated, falsified and perverted another man’s work. The ‘germ theory’, so-called, long antedated Pasteur – so long, in fact, that he was able to present it as new; and he got away with it.

A Synthesis of the Work of Enderlein, Bechamps and other Pleomorphic Researchers

Dr. Karl Horst Poehlman


Article

All mammals and most likely all other animals have two parasites. They are in a particular relationship and supplement each other. Those two parasites or endobionts are called Mucor racemosus Fresen and Aspergillus niger van Tiegham. Bechamp, Rife and Naessens all demonstrated that they are virtually indestructible.

Neither carbonizing temperatures nor radioactive radiation can harm them. Enderlein believed that they entered the cells of higher differentiated cell colonies as parasites, while Antoine Bechamp believed that they are the essence of life in the cell.

The endobiont is always present, and cannot be removed from the living cell; the clinical symptoms of a disease depend on the stage of its development. This ‘fungal parasite’ can be present in all tissues and organs.

A Vindication of Weston Price’s ideas

SMITHSONIAN.COM / LINK


This Simthsonian article explains the link between dental structure and the change to an agricultural diet. Weston Price was right. The emergence of agricultural practices initiated major changes to the jaw structure of ancient humans, leading to dental problems we still experience.

All Human Blood is Infected with Bacteria

Alan Cantwell


Article

Bacteria are everywhere. Our mouths, throat, nose, ears all harbor germs. But what about the blood? Under ‘normal’ conditions physicians generally believe human blood is ‘sterile’. The idea of bacteria living in the blood normally is largely considered medical heresy. Dr Cantwell provides evidence showing the existence of bacterial entities in the blood. This directly relates to the work of Antoine Bechamp.

Antoine Bechamp, Pleomorphism and Microzymas

David Major


An introduction to Antoine Bechamp.

Bechamp should, by rights, be regarded today as one of the founders of modern medicine and biology. During his long career as an academic and researcher in nineteenth century France, Béchamp was widely known and respected as both a teacher and a researcher. As a leading academic, his work was well documented in scientific circles. His last book, The Blood and its Third Element, documents his most important experiments and findings.

Few made as much use of this fact as Louis Pasteur, who based much of his career on plagiarising and distorting Béchamp’s research.

Cancer and Most Diseases are Caused by Bacteria

Alan Cantwell


Article

A century and a half ago, Antoine Bechamp declared the microzyma is the essential unit of life. He observed tiny, round granular bodies within the cells that glistened as tiny sparkles of refracted light. He was not the first to see the granules, but he was the first to suspect these ‘little bodies’ might hold the key to the origin of life.

Bechamp taught that all life arises from microzymas. After many laboratory experiments and microscopic examinations, he claimed that microzymas were capable of developing into common living organisms that go by the name of bacteria. Some of these intermediate bacterial stages were regarded by experts as different species, but to Bechamp they were all related and derived from microzymas.

Eugene Marais

DMAJOR


Dorris Lessing wrote of Eugene Marais: “He offers a vision of nature as a whole, whose parts obey different time-laws, move in affinities and linkages we could learn to see: parts making wholes on their own level, but seen by our divisive brains as a multitude of individualities, a flock of birds, a species of plant or beast. We are just at the start of an understanding of the heavens as a web of interlocking clocks, all differently set: an understanding that is not intellectual, but woven into experience. Marais brings this thought down into the plain, the hedgerow, the garden.”
Here is a collection of material from various sources related to the South African scientist and poet, Eugen Marais.

Gaston Naessens: Somatid and Somatoscope

Fitzraven Sky


Gaston Naessens’ somatid theory of the origins of cancer, the result of over 40 years of research in bacteriology and biology (the last 20 funded personally by the late David Stewart of the MacDonald-Stewart Foundation), has its roots in the concept of pleomorphism, first advanced by Antoine Bechamp in France in the 1870’s. Pleomorphism is the assumption of multiple forms, or stages, by a single organism during its life cycle. Bechamp postulated such a pleomorphic (literally, shape-changing) micro-organism, which he named “microzymia” as a common progenitor of all bacteria.

Geological Micro-leavens

In this account of one of his experiments which demonstrates the existence of microzymas, Bechamp added chalk to maintain the neutrality of the medium. He was surprised to see two different reactions, depending on whether he used chemically pure calcium carbonate or commercial chalk, all other factors being equal.

The first solution, with sugar added and treated with creosote, did not ferment.

The second solution, under the same conditions, fermented.

On microscopic examination of the commercial chalk, Bechamp invariably found the “little bodies” observed in his previous experiments. “They are organized and living”, they act like moulds, they are agents of fermentation — they are ‘micro-leavens’.

Link: Four Thousand Years Ago, Indians landed in Australia

LULU MORRIS, LINK TO NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC


Genetic evidence suggests that just over 4 millennia ago a group of Indian travellers landed in Australia and stayed. The evidence emerged a few years ago after a group of Aboriginal men’s Y chromosomes matched with Y chromosomes typically found in Indian men.  Up until now, the exact details, though, have been unclear…