Articles

Link: Some facts and figures about Universal Suffrage in the UK

WILLIAM COLLINS / LINK


The popular belief is that the suffragettes won the vote for women and before that men already had the vote. Both these beliefs are false. The property-based right to vote goes back at least to King Henry VI in 1432, when it was established that only people owning property worth 40 shillings or more could vote. Since this sum remained unchanged over centuries, the natural effect of inflation was to increase the size of the electorate. But even by the eighteenth century, the electorate was still only about 1% or 2% of the population

Link: The Origin of a “Revolutionary Theory”

Helian.net


Link

Eugene Marais was a human community in the person of one man. He was a poet, an advocate, a journalist, a story-teller, a drug addict, a psychologist, a natural scientist. He embraced the pains of many, the visions of the few, and perhaps the burden was too much for one man… As a scientist he was unique, supreme in his time, yet a worker in a science then unborn. – R. Ardrey, The Soul of the Ape (Introduction)

Mechanical and Electrical Responses in Living Matter

Jagadish Bose


The first two chapters of ‘Response in the Living and Non-living’.

Mechanical response to different kinds of stimuli

 This reaction under stimulus is seen even in the lowest organisms; in some of the amœboid rhizopods, for instance. These lumpy protoplasmic bodies, usually elongated while creeping, if mechanically jarred, contract into a spherical form.

If, instead of mechanical  disturbance, we apply salt solution, they again contract, in the same way as before. Similar effects are produced by sudden illumination, or by rise of temperature, or by electric shock.

A living substance may thus be put into an excitatory state by either mechanical, chemical, thermal, electrical, or light stimulus. Not only does the point stimulated show the effect of stimulus, but that effect may sometimes be conducted even to a considerable distance.

My Early Life

Nikola Tesla


Extract from the book ‘My Inventions’

The first chapter of Tesla’s book contains his recollections of his childhood.

“The progressive development of man is vitally dependent on invention. It is the most important product of his creative brain. Its ultimate purpose is the complete mastery of mind over the material world, the harnessing of the forces of nature to human needs. This is the difficult task of the inventor, who is often misunderstood and unrewarded.” – Tesla.

My life, up to the age of forty, had been spent in my native city of Philadelphia…

Edmund Morris


The first two chapters of ‘Ten Acres is Enough’.

THE MAN WHO FEEDS his cattle on a thousand hills may possibly see the title of this little volume paraded through the newspapers; but the chances are that he will never think it worthwhile to look into the volume itself. The owner of a hundred acres will scarcely step out of his way to purchase or to borrow it, while the lord of every smaller farm will be sure it is not intended for him.

Few persons belonging to these various classes have been educated to believe that ten acres are enough. Born to greater ambition, they have aimed higher and grasped at more, sometimes wisely, sometimes not. Many of these are now owning or cultivating more land than their heads or purses enable them to manage properly. Had their ambition been moderate and their ideas more practical, their labor would be better rewarded, and this book, without doubt, would have found more readers.

Nanobacteria: surely not figments, but what are they?

Nannobacteria are very small living creatures in the 0.05 to 0.2 micrometer range. They are enormously abundant in minerals and rocks, and probably run most of the earth’s surface chemistry. Although it is conjectured that they form most of the world’s biomass, they remain “biota incognita” to the biological world as their genetic relationships, metabolism, and other characteristics remain to be investigated.

Notes on the Coagulation of the Blood

Antoine Bechamp


Extract from the book ‘The Blood and its Third Element’.

The object of this work is the solution of a problem of the first order; to show the real nature of the blood, and to demonstrate the character of its organization. It has, besides, a secondary purpose; the solution of a problem long ago stated, but never solved – the cause of its coagulation, correctly regarded as spontaneous, after it has issued from the blood vessels.

The conclusion arrived at is that the blood is a flowing tissue, spontaneously alterable in the same manner as are all other tissues withdrawn from the animal, coagulation of the blood being only the first phase of its spontaneous change.

This article by Antoine Bechamp is extracted from The Blood and its Third Element.

On Bechamp and Pleomorphism

The Life Enthusiast


Article

“…all natural organic matters (matters that once lived), absolutely protected from atmospheric germs, invariably and spontaneously alter and ferment, because they necessarily and inherently contain within themselves the agents of their spontaneous alteration, digestion, dissolution”. These agents are of course the self same Protits of Enderlein. As noted, Béchamp called them Microzymas. He proved that all animal and plant cells contain these tiny particles which continue to live after the death of the organism and out of which microorganisms can develop. In his book Mycrozymas, Béchamp laid the foundation for the concept of pleomorphism….”

Philippa Uwins and Nanobes

Philippa Uwins and her colleagues at the University of Queensland, Australia, noticed strange structures growing on sandstone rock samples they had broken open for studying. The rock samples had been retrieved from 3 to 5 Kilometres below the ocean bed where atmospheric pressure is around 2000x normal, and temperatures range between 115 to 170 degs Centigrade; not an easy place for living things to flourish!
This initial discovery was curious enough but when the team found that containers and equipment in their laboratory were being ‘colonised’ by these structures, they realised whatever they had found was growing! Samples were collected from polystyrene petri dishes with sterilised micro-forceps and examined in a powerful SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) operating at 80 Kvolts.

Preface to ‘The Blood and its Third Element’

Antoine Bechamp


The author’s preface to ‘The Blood and its Third Element’.

This work upon the blood, which I present at last to the learned public, is the crown to a collection of works upon ferments and fermentation, spontaneous generation, albuminoid substances, organization, physiology and general pathology which I have pursued without relaxation since 1854, at the same time with other researches of pure chemistry more or less directly related to them, and, it must be added, in the midst of a thousand difficulties raised up by relentless opponents from all sides, especially whence I least expected them.

To solve some very delicate problems I had to create new methods of research and of physiological, chemical and anatomical analysis. Ever since 1857 these researches have been directed by a precise design to a determined end: the enunciation of a new doctrine regarding organization and life.

It led to the microzymian theory of the living organization, which has led to the discovery of the true nature of blood by that of its third anatomical element, and, at last, to a rational, natural explanation of the phenomenon called its spontaneous coagulation.