Pleomorphism

Gaston Naessens: Somatid and Somatoscope

Fitzraven Sky


Gaston Naessens’ somatid theory of the origins of cancer, the result of over 40 years of research in bacteriology and biology (the last 20 funded personally by the late David Stewart of the MacDonald-Stewart Foundation), has its roots in the concept of pleomorphism, first advanced by Antoine Bechamp in France in the 1870’s. Pleomorphism is the assumption of multiple forms, or stages, by a single organism during its life cycle. Bechamp postulated such a pleomorphic (literally, shape-changing) micro-organism, which he named “microzymia” as a common progenitor of all bacteria.

Royal Rife and Hepatitis

Ken Welch


On August 19th the New England Journal of Medicine carried an article warning that 2.7 million Americans now carry the Hepatitis-C virus, according to statistics from the CDC. This would make Hepatitis, a potentially fatal disease, the most common blood-borne infection in the country. Globally, the World Health Organization has reported that almost half the world’s population carries one or more of the various hepatitis virus, and fatalities are greater than for HIV.

Philippa Uwins and Nanobes

Philippa Uwins and her colleagues at the University of Queensland, Australia, noticed strange structures growing on sandstone rock samples they had broken open for studying. The rock samples had been retrieved from 3 to 5 Kilometres below the ocean bed where atmospheric pressure is around 2000x normal, and temperatures range between 115 to 170 degs Centigrade; not an easy place for living things to flourish!
This initial discovery was curious enough but when the team found that containers and equipment in their laboratory were being ‘colonised’ by these structures, they realised whatever they had found was growing! Samples were collected from polystyrene petri dishes with sterilised micro-forceps and examined in a powerful SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) operating at 80 Kvolts.

Radio Interview (transcript) with Philippa Uwins about Nanobes

Nanobes are a group of organisms which were discovered growing in some sandstone samples that came from outer western Australia. The interesting thing about the nanobes is that they’re in a size range that’s argued, on a current understanding of biological theory to be too small to exist. And the other interesting aspect of the nanobes is that they’re in the same size range as the controversial Martian nanobe bacteria that were found in a meteorite some years ago.

Nanobacteria: surely not figments, but what are they?

Nannobacteria are very small living creatures in the 0.05 to 0.2 micrometer range. They are enormously abundant in minerals and rocks, and probably run most of the earth’s surface chemistry. Although it is conjectured that they form most of the world’s biomass, they remain “biota incognita” to the biological world as their genetic relationships, metabolism, and other characteristics remain to be investigated.

To Be or Not to Be? – 150 Years of Hidden Knowledge

Christopher Bird


An overview of astounding findings in a field of knowledge that deals with the very smallest forms of life.

Hard as it is to believe, these findings, made over more than a century ago, have been consistently ignored, censored by silence, or suppressed throughout all of that time by ruling “opinion-makers”, orthodox thinkers in mainstream microbiology.

Instead of being welcomed with excitement and open arms, as one would a friend or lover, the amazing discoveries have been received with a hostility unusually only meted out to trespassers or imposters.

To try to present the vastness of a multi-dimensional panorama, is a little like trying to inscribe the contents of thick manuscript onto a postage stamp, or reduce the production of an hour-long drama into a few minutes of stage time.

Geological Micro-leavens

In this account of one of his experiments which demonstrates the existence of microzymas, Bechamp added chalk to maintain the neutrality of the medium. He was surprised to see two different reactions, depending on whether he used chemically pure calcium carbonate or commercial chalk, all other factors being equal.

The first solution, with sugar added and treated with creosote, did not ferment.

The second solution, under the same conditions, fermented.

On microscopic examination of the commercial chalk, Bechamp invariably found the “little bodies” observed in his previous experiments. “They are organized and living”, they act like moulds, they are agents of fermentation — they are ‘micro-leavens’.

Antoine Bechamp, Pleomorphism and Microzymas

David Major


An introduction to Antoine Bechamp.

Bechamp should, by rights, be regarded today as one of the founders of modern medicine and biology. During his long career as an academic and researcher in nineteenth century France, Béchamp was widely known and respected as both a teacher and a researcher. As a leading academic, his work was well documented in scientific circles. His last book, The Blood and its Third Element, documents his most important experiments and findings.

Few made as much use of this fact as Louis Pasteur, who based much of his career on plagiarising and distorting Béchamp’s research.

Preface to ‘The Blood and its Third Element’

Antoine Bechamp


The author’s preface to ‘The Blood and its Third Element’.

This work upon the blood, which I present at last to the learned public, is the crown to a collection of works upon ferments and fermentation, spontaneous generation, albuminoid substances, organization, physiology and general pathology which I have pursued without relaxation since 1854, at the same time with other researches of pure chemistry more or less directly related to them, and, it must be added, in the midst of a thousand difficulties raised up by relentless opponents from all sides, especially whence I least expected them.

To solve some very delicate problems I had to create new methods of research and of physiological, chemical and anatomical analysis. Ever since 1857 these researches have been directed by a precise design to a determined end: the enunciation of a new doctrine regarding organization and life.

It led to the microzymian theory of the living organization, which has led to the discovery of the true nature of blood by that of its third anatomical element, and, at last, to a rational, natural explanation of the phenomenon called its spontaneous coagulation.

A History of the Germ Theory

R. Pearson


Extract from Bechamp or Pasteur?

If you go back into the history of the medical profession and the various ideas regarding the cause of disease that were held by leading physicians before Pasteur first promulgated his notorious “germ theory”, you will find convincing evidence that Pasteur discovered nothing, and that he deliberately appropriated, falsified and perverted another man’s work. The ‘germ theory’, so-called, long antedated Pasteur – so long, in fact, that he was able to present it as new; and he got away with it.